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Sea Shantys
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 12:58 am    Post subject: Sea Shantys Reply with quote

I am starting a list of sea shantys, some likely to have been sung aboard pirate ships. Here is the first one:

All For Me Grog


This song is a not a shanty, it is a sea song.
Grog was a mixture of rum and water served aboard ship.
The amount of rum used varied with the ship and the times.
It was served as a ration in the United States Navy
until September 1, 1862, and in the Royal Navy until 1970.

Lyrics

And it's all for me grog, me jolly, jolly grog
All for me beer and tobacco
Well I spent all me tin on the lassies drinking gin
Across the western ocean I must wander

Where are me boots, me noggin, noggin boots
they're all gone for beer and tobacco
For the heels they are worn out and the toes are kicked about
And the soles are looking for better weather

And it's all for me grog, me jolly, jolly grog
All for me beer and tobacco
Well I spent all me tin on the lassies drinking gin
Across the western ocean I must wander

Where is me shirt me noggin, noggin shirt
It's all gone for beer and tobacco
For the collar is all worn and the sleeves they are all torn
And the tail is looking for better weather

And it's all for me grog, me jolly, jolly grog
All for me beer and tobacco
Well I spent all me tin on the lassies drinking gin
Across the western ocean I must wander

I'm sick in the head and I haven't gone to bed
Since I first came ashore from me slumber
For I spent all me dough on the lassies don't you know
Far across the western ocean I must wander

And it's all for me grog, me jolly, jolly grog
All for me beer and tobacco
Well I spent all me tin on the lassies drinking gin
Across the western ocean I must wander
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 12:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Black Ball Line


This tune is a variant of 'Blow the Man Down', which originated in
Western Ocean sailing ships. The tune could have originated with
German emigrants, but it is more likely derived from an African-
American song 'Knock a Man Down'. 'Blow the Man Down' was
originally a halyard shanty. The Black Ball Line was founded by a
group of Quakers in 1818. It was the first line to take passengers on
a regular basis, sailing from New York, Boston and Philadelphia
across the Atlantic on the first and sixteenth day of each month. The
Blackball flag was a crimson swallow-tail flag with a black ball.
These ships were famous for their fast passage and excellent
seamanship. However, they were also famed for their fighting mates
and the brutal treatment of seamen. (Western Ocean seamen were
called "Packet Rats"). Many ships bore the name "bloodboat".
Most of the seamen hailed from New York or Liverpool, and many
were Irish. By the 1880's the sailing ships were being replaced by
steamers.

Music by - Unknown Artist


Lyrics

In the Black Ball Line I serv'd my time
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
In the Black Ball Line I serv'd my time
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

The Black Ball ships are good and true,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
They are the ships for me and you.
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

For once there was a Black Ball ship,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
That fourteen knots an hour could slip,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

Her yards were square, her gear all new,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
She had a good and gallant crew,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

One day whilst sailing on the sea,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
They saw a vessel on their lee,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

They knew it was a pirate craft,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
All armed with guns before and aft,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

She fired a shot across their bow,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
Which was not kind you must allow,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

They did not fear as you may think
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
But made the pirates water drink,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

They gave that vessel their sharp stem,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
And cut her through; more praise to them,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

They seized the pirates' wicked mate,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
He was so bad they broke his pate,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

The skipper and his wicked crew,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
They sunk beneath the waters blue,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

It was a plucky thing to do
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
To cut the Pirate vessel through,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

Then drink success to the Black Ball Line,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
Their ships are good, their men are fine.
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!

In the Black Ball Line I served my time,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line
In the Black Ball Line I served my time,
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line!
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Rusty Edge
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 1:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great idea for a thread, Salty Dog!
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 5:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blow the Man Down


This old song was originally a halyard shanty in Western Ocean
sailing ships. The tune is likely derived from an African-American
song called 'Knock a Man Down'. The Black Ballers back then
were fast packet ships of the American Black Ball Line that sailed
between New York and Liverpool in the second half of the 19th century.
The faster the ship reached it's destination, the quicker a sailor
could get paid. Therefore many sailors wanted to sail on these ships.
Life at sea in those days was rule with a fist, and the captains of
the Black Ballers had a reputation for being particularly brutal.
When a sailor said that a man was blown down, it meant that he was
knocked to the ground. With a fist, belaying pin, capstan bar or
whatever else was handy. Chief Mates then were known as "blowers",
second mates as "strikers" and third mates as "greasers". This song
was in fact about the harsh beating of sailors aboard these ships.
There are countless lyrical versions of 'Blow the Man Down'.

Lyrics

Come all ye young fellows that follow the sea,
to my way haye, blow the man down,
And please pay attention and listen to me,
Give me some time to blow the man down.

I'm a deep water sailor just in from Hong Kong,
to my way haye, blow the man down,
if you'll give me some grog, I'll sing you a song,
Give me some time to blow the man down.

'Twas on a Black Baller I first served my time,
to my way haye, blow the man down,
And on that Black Baller I wasted my prime,
Give me some time to blow the man down.

'Tis when a Black Baller's preparing for sea
to my way haye, blow the man down,
You'd split your sides laughing at the sites that you see.
Give me some time to blow the man down.

With the tinkers and tailors and soljers and all
to my way haye, blow the man down,
That ship for prime seaman on board a Black Ball.
Give me some time to blow the man down.

'Tis when a Black Baller is clear of the land,
to my way haye, blow the man down,
Our Boatswain then gives us the word of command
Give me some time to blow the man down.

"Lay aft," is the cry,"to the break of the Poop"!
to my way haye, blow the man down,
Or I'll help you along with the toe of my boot!
Give me some time to blow the man down.

'Tis larboard and starboard on the deck you will sprawl,
to my way haye, blow the man down,
For "Kicking Jack" Williams commands the Black Ball.
Give me some time to blow the man down.

Pay attention to order, now you one and all,
to my way haye, blow the man down,
For right there above you flies the Black Ball.
Give me some time to blow the man down.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Bold Princess Royal


This song is said to be based on a true story.
It was a popular broadside ballad in England and
America, during the mid and late 1800s.

Lyrics

On the fourteenth of February
We sailed from the land,
In the bold Princess Royal
Bound for Newfoundland,
We had forty brave seamen
For our ship's company,
And boldly from the eastward
To the westward sailed we.

'We had not been sailing
Past days two or three,
When a man from our foremast
A sail he did see,
She hove down upon us
To see what we were,
And under her foremast
Black colours she wore.

Now when this bold pirate
She hove alongside,
With a large speaking trumpet,
'Whence come you?' they cried.
Our captain being aft, boys,
He answered him so;
We come from fair London
And we're bound for Cairo:'

'Come haul down your topsails,
Your sternsails also,
For I have a letter
To send home by you'
'I'll not haul down my topsail
Nor heave my sails to,
But shall be in some harbour,
Not alongside of you?'

They fired shot after us
But could not prevail,
When the bold Princess Royal
Soon shewed them her tail,
They drove us to windward,
But couldn't make us stay,
We hoisted our mainsail
And then bore away.

'Thank God,' cries our captain,
'The pirate is gone.
Come down to your grog boys,
Come down everyone,
Come down to your grog boys
And be of good cheer,
For while we have sea-room,
Brave boys, never fear.'
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bound for the Rio Grande


This song was one of the most popular sea shanties. It had several
variations. Alternate titles include "Away for Rio" and "The Rio Grande".
The Rio Grande referred to in the lyrics is not located between Texas
and Mexico. The song instead refers to the Rio Grande do Sul, in Brazil.
Some versions of the song refer to "golden sand." The banks of the
Rio Grande in Brazil have high sand dunes and in the 18th century gold
was found in southern Brazil. Although gold was also found in the Mexican
Rio Grande area, it was not until later, when this song was already well
established. This tune was a capstan or windlass shanty and was commonly
sung on ships leaving the West Coast of England and Wales.

Lyrics

I'll sing you a song of the fish of the sea,
Way, Rio!
I'll sing you a song of the fish of the sea,
And we're bound for the Rio Grande!

Then away, love, away,
Way, Rio!
So fare ye well, my pretty young gal,
We are bound for the Rio Grande!

It's goodbye to Sally and goodbye to Sue,
Way, Rio!
And you who are listening goodbye to you,
For we're bound for the Rio Grande!

So man the good capstan and run it around,
Way, Rio!
We'll heave up the anchor to this jolly sound,
For we're bound for the Rio Grande!

Then away, love, away,
Way, Rio!
So fare ye well, my pretty young gal,
We are bound for the Rio Grande!

Our ship went a-sailing out over the bar,
Way, Rio!
We pointed her nose for the southeren star,
For we're bound for the Rio Grande!

Then away, love, away,
Way, Rio!
So fare ye well, my pretty young gal,
We are bound for the Rio Grande!

The anchor is weighed and the sails they are set,
Way, Rio!
The maids that we're leaving we'll never forget,
For we're bound for the Rio Grande!

Then away, love, away,
Way, Rio!
So fare ye well, my pretty young gal,
We are bound for the Rio Grande!
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 11:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ballad of Captain Kidd


William Kidd had been given a commission as a privateer
by New York and Massachusetts to hunt pirates.
Along the way, Kidd himself would turn to piracy.
He killed his gunner, William Moore, during a threatened mutiny.
He was later hanged as a pirate in 1701. This tune
appeared as a (broadside shanty) shortly afterwards.


Lyrics

My name is William Kidd,as I sailed, as I sailed
My name is William Kidd, as I sailed
My name is William Kidd, God's laws I did forbid
And most wickedly I did, as I sailed, as I sailed

Oh, my parents taught me well, as I sailed, as I sailed
My parents taught me well, as I sailed
My parents taught me well to shun the gates of Hell
But against them I rebelled, as I sailed, as I sailed

Oh, I murdered William Moore, as I sailed, as I sailed
I murdered William Moore, as I sailed
I murdered William Moore and I left him in his gore
Many leagues from shore, as I sailed, as I sailed

Oh, I steered from sound to sound, as I sailed, as I sailed
Oh I steered from sound to sound, as I sailed
I steered from sound to sound, and many ships I found
And all of them I burned as I sailed, as I sailed

And being cruel still, as I sailed, as I sailed
And being cruel still, as I sailed
And being cruel still my gunner I did kill
And his precious blood did spill, as I sailed, as I sailed

I was sick and nigh to death, as I sailed, as I sailed
I was sick and nigh to death, as I sailed
I was sick and nigh to death and I vowed with every breath
To walk in wisdom's ways when I sailed, when I sailed

My repentance lasted not, as I sailed, as I sailed
My repentance lasted not, as I sailed
My repentance lasted not, my vows I soon forgot
Damnation was my lot, as I sailed, as I sailed

To execution dock I must go, I must go
To execution dock I must go
To execution dock, while many thousands flock
But I must bear the shock and must die, and must die,

Take a warning now by me, for I must die, for I must die,
Take a warning now by me for I must die
Take a warning now by me and shun bad company,
Lest you come to hell with me, for I must die, I must die.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Coasts of High Barbary


This ballad is an American variant of an older ballad. There is an
entry in the Stationers' Register January 14, 1595 for a ballad 'The
Soldier's Joy'. The entry states that this ballad is to be sung to the
tune. The ballad was given new words and experienced a
resurgence of popularity in America between the years of 1795 and
1815 - when Barbary pirates were attacking American ships.
America (and most other nations) paid tribute to the pirates until the
government took action in 1801. The pirates were not completely
defeated until 1815. This song is not normally considered a shanty.
However, there is a capstain shanty variant called 'High Harbaree'.

The original ballad refers to two merchant vessels, The George
Aloe, and The Sweepstake which were bound for Safee. The
George Aloe anchored but the Sweepstake continued, being
overtaken by a French ship. Her crew was thrown overboard. The
George Aloe then pursued the French ship and defeated her.
Though the French crew begged for mercy the English replied they
would show them the same mercy that the French showed the crew
of the Sweepstake.

Lyrics

Look ahead, look a stern,
Look the weather in the lee,
Blow high! Blow low! And so sailed we.
I see a wreck to the windward
And a lofty ship to lee,
A sailing down all on
The coasts of High Barbary

O are you a pirate
Or a man-o-war? cried we.
Blow high! Blow low! And so sailed we.
O no! I'm not a pirate
But a man-o-war, cried he.
A sailing down all on
The coasts of High Barbary

We'll back up our topsails
And heave our vessel to;
Blow high! Blow low! And so sailed we.
For we have got some letters
To be carried home by you.
A sailing down all on
The coasts of High Barbary

For broadside, for broadside
They fought all on the main;
Blow high! Blow low! And so sailed we.
Until at last the frigate
Shot the pirate's mast away.
A sailing down all on
The coasts of High Barbary

For quarters! For quarters!
The saucy pirates cried,
Blow high! Blow low! And so sailed we.
The quarters that we showed them
Was to sink them in the tide.
A sailing down all on
The coasts of High Barbary

With cutlass and gun,
O we fought for hours three;
Blow high! Blow low! And so sailed we.
The ship it was their coffin
And their grave it was the sea.
A sailing down all on
The coasts of High Barbary
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Dead Horse


The Dead Horse was a ceremonial shanty sung at the end of a
sailor's first month at sea. It was to celebrate the end of the sailor's
debt to the ship (when he started working for himself.) Sailor's were
traditionally paid a month in advance when they signed onto a ship.
With the advance he could pay for boots, knives, weather gear, etc.
However many agents took the advance money and shanghaied
sailors aboard, other sailors spent the money on drink and women
before sailing, and some were cheated out of it by greedy
merchants. So very often the sailor had nothing to show for a
month's work. The dead horse metaphor is from the practice of
horse-trading. When a deal was made there was no going back,
even if the horse died right after the deal was struck. So you could
be paying for something that was never any use. Hence, the "dead
horse." For the ceremony sailors fashioned horses of shipboard
scrap to drag around the deck. They hoisted them aloft and threw
them into the ocean.

Lyrics

A poor old man came riding by
Chorus 1
And we say so, and we hope so
A poor old man came riding by
Chorus 2
Oh, poor old horse.

Says I, "Old man, your horse will die."
Chorus 1
Says I, "Old man, your horse will die."
Chorus 2

And if he dies we'll tan his skin
Chorus 1
And if he don't we'll ride him again.
Chorus 2

For one long month I rode him hard
Chorus 1
For one long month we all rode him hard.
Chorus 2

But now your month is up, old Turk
Chorus 1
Get up, you swine, and look for work
Chorus 2

Get up you swine and look for graft
Chorus 1
While we lays on and drags ye aft
Chorus 2

He's as dead as a nail in the lamp-room door
Chorus 1
And he won't come worring us no more
Chorus 2

We'll use the hair of his tail to sew our sails
Chorus 1
And the iron of his shoe to make deck nails
Chorus 2

We'll hoist him up to the fore yard-arm
Chorus 1
Where he won't do sailors any harm
Chorus 2

We'll drop him down with a long, long roll
Chorus 1
Where the sharks will have his body and the
Devil take his soul.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This popular song also known as 'Yo Ho Ho' or 'Fifteen Men',
was not a shanty or an old sea song. In 1901 it was originally
used in the play "Treasure Island". The first verse was written
by Robert Lewis Stevenson for his book "Treasure Island".

Lyrics

Fifteen men on a dead man's chest
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum
Drink and the devil had done for the rest
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum.
The mate was fixed by the bosun's pike
The bosun brained with a marlinspike
And cookey's throat was marked belike
It had been gripped by fingers ten;
And there they lay, all good dead men
Like break o'day in a boozing ken.
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum.

Fifteen men of the whole ship's list
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum!
Dead and be damned and the rest gone whist!
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum!
The skipper lay with his nob in gore
Where the scullion's axe his cheek had shore
And the scullion he was stabbed times four
And there they lay, and the soggy skies
Dripped down in up-staring eyes
In murk sunset and foul sunrise
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum.

Fifteen men of 'em stiff and stark
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum!
Ten of the crew had the murder mark!
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum!
Twas a cutlass swipe or an ounce of lead
Or a yawing hole in a battered head
And the scuppers' glut with a rotting red
And there they lay, aye, damn my eyes
Looking up at paradise
All souls bound just contrariwise
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum.

Fifteen men of 'em good and true
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum!
Ev'ry man jack could ha' sailed with Old Pew,
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum!
There was chest on chest of Spanish gold
With a ton of plate in the middle hold
And the cabins riot of stuff untold,
And they lay there that took the plum
With sightless glare and their lips struck dumb
While we shared all by the rule of thumb,
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum!

More was seen through a sternlight screen
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum
Chartings undoubt where a woman had been
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum.
'Twas a flimsy shift on a bunker cot
With a dirk slit sheer through the bosom spot
And the lace stiff dry in a purplish blot
Oh was she wench or some shudderin' maid
That dared the knife and took the blade
By God! she had stuff for a plucky jade
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum.

Fifteen men on a dead man's chest
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum
Drink and the devil had done for the rest
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum.
We wrapped 'em all in a mains'l tight
With twice ten turns of a hawser's bight
And we heaved 'em over and out of sight,
With a Yo-Heave-Ho! and a fare-you-well
And a sudden plunge in the sullen swell
Ten fathoms deep on the road to hell,
Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum!
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 6:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is another BIG one, very common!!

Drunken Sailor


This song was a popular capstan shanty, sung to raising the anchor.
In order to raise the anchor, bars were inserted into the capstan wheel
and sailors would walk around it, turning the capstan to raise the anchor.
Sailors would stamp on the deck on the words "Way Hay and Up She Rises."
Additional verses would be created as necessary until the job was completed.
There were several versions of this old classic shanty, some with lyrics
that were very amusing, while other could be quite offensive.
The lyrics used below are rather tame standard ones.

Lyrics

What will we do with a drunken sailor?
What will we do with a drunken sailor?
What will we do with a drunken sailor?
Early in the morning!

Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Early in the morning!

Shave his belly with a rusty razor,
Shave his belly with a rusty razor,
Shave his belly with a rusty razor,
Early in the morning!

Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Early in the morning!

Put him in a long boat till his sober,
Put him in a long boat till his sober,
Put him in a long boat till his sober,
Early in the morning!

Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Early in the morning!

Stick him in a barrel with a hosepipe on him,
Stick him in a barrel with a hosepipe on him,
Stick him in a barrel with a hosepipe on him,
Early in the morning!

Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Early in the morning!

Put him in the bed with the captains daughter,
Put him in the bed with the captains daughter,
Put him in the bed with the captains daughter,
Early in the morning!

Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Early in the morning!

Thatís what we do with a drunken sailor,
Thatís what we do with a drunken sailor,
Thatís what we do with a drunken sailor,
Early in the morning!

Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Early in the morning!



Other Verses:


What shall we do with a drunken sailor,
What shall we do with a drunken sailor,
What shall we do with a drunken sailor,
Earl-eye in the morning!

Chorus
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Earl-eye in the morning

Put him in a long-boat till he's sober,
Put him in a long-boat till he's sober,
Put him in a long-boat till he's sober,
Earl-eye in the morning!

Chorus
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Earl-eye in the morning

Pull out the plug and wet him all over,
Pull out the plug and wet him all over,
Pull out the plug and wet him all over,
Earl-eye in the morning!

Chorus
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Earl-eye in the morning

Put him in the bilge and make him drink it,
Put him in the bilge and make him drink it,
Put him in the bilge and make him drink it,
Earl-eye in the morning!

Chorus
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Earl-eye in the morning

Shave his belly with a rusty razor,
Shave his belly with a rusty razor,
Shave his belly with a rusty razor,
Earl-eye in the morning!

Chorus
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Earl-eye in the morning

Heave him by the leg with a running bowline,
Heave him by the leg with a running bowline,
Heave him by the leg with a running bowline,
Earl-eye in the morning!

Chorus
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Earl-eye in the morning

Keel haul him until he gets sober,
Keel haul him until he gets sober,
Keel haul him until he gets sober,
Earl-eye in the morning!

Chorus
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Earl-eye in the morning

That's what we do with the drunken sailor,
That's what we do with the drunken sailor,
That's what we do with the drunken sailor,
Earl-eye in the morning

Chorus
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Way hay and up she rises,
Earl-eye in the morning
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Rusty Edge
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know it with words "Scrape his belly with a rusty razor" , which might be more likely to wake him up than shaving.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 8:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eliza Lee


This was a capstan shanty, and a favorite in Yankee Packets.
Song also was known as Clear the Track, Let the Bulgine Run.
Other versions have verses with the Rosalind, a ship of the
Blackball line. Packets were so-called because they were ships
that carried mail from Britain to America. In 1818, the Blackball
line was founded by a group of Quakers. This was the first line
to have a regular schedule. Seamen serving aboard were called
"Packet Rats". Most of the seamen hailed from New York or were
Liverpool-Irish. Bulgine was a slang term at the time for engine.

Lyrics

The smartest clipper you can find is,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
Shes the Margaret Evans on a blue sky line!
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

To my aye rig a jig in a junting gun,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
With Eliza Lee all on my knee,
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

Oh the Margaret Evans on the blue star line,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
Shes never a day behind the time,
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

To my aye rig a jig in a junting gun,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
With Eliza Lee all on my knee,
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

And when we're over in New York Town,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
We'll dance their bowly girls around,
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

To my aye rig a jig in a junting gun,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
With Eliza Lee all on my knee,
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

Oh, we're outward bound for the west creek pier
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
We'll go ashore at liverpool pier,
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

To my aye rig a jig in a junting gun,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
With Eliza Lee all on my knee,
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

Oh, when we're back in Liverpool town,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
I'll stand your whiskeys all around!
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

To my aye rig a jig in a junting gun,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
With Eliza Lee all on my knee,
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 2:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hanging Johnny


This was one of the best and most popular halyard shanties.
Additional verses, hanging anyone that came to mind, would be
added to last as long as the job took. There is speculation that
"Hanging Johnny" may refer to the eighteenth century hangman,
Jack Ketch. In fact "Jack Ketch" was a term used to refer to all
hangman, named after a Jack Ketch who was the executioner at
Tyburn from 1663-1686. The shanty was also said to be sung by
African-American soldiers in the Civil war who were recruited from
the sea islands of the Carolina coast. They added additional verses
dealing with their enlistment in the army.

Lyrics

They call me hanging Johnnie,
Horray, Hooray!
They call me hanging Johnnie,
Hang, boys, hang.

They say I hang for money,
Horray, Hooray!
But saying so is funny;
Hang, boys, hang.

I'd hang the highway robber,
Horray, Hooray!
I'd hang the burglar jobber;
Hang, boys, hang.

I'd hang a noted liar,
Horray, Hooray!
I'd hang a bloated friar;
Hang, boys, hang.

Come hang, come haul together,
Horray, Hooray!
Come hang for finer weather,
Hang, boys, hang.

I'd hang a brutal mother,
Horray, Hooray!
I'd hang her and no other;
Hang, boys, hang.

I'd hang to make things jolly,
Horray, Hooray!
I'd hang all wrong and folly;
Hang, boys, hang.

They call me hanging Johnnie.
Horray, Hooray!
They call me hanging Johnnie,
Hang, boys, hang.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 2:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haul Away, Joe


This song was a popular tack and sheet shanty,
from the early eighteen hundreds. There were many
variations and lyrics to the song, verses could
be added in order to complete a given task.
It may have also been used as a halyard shanty.

Lyrics

When I was a little lad
And so my mother told me,
Way, haul away, we'll haul away Joe,
That if I did not kiss a gal
My lips would grow all moldy,
Way, haul away, we'll haul away Joe.

Chorus;
Way, haul away, we'll haul for better weather,
Way, haul away, we'll haul away Joe.

King Louis was the King of France
Before the Revolution,
Way, haul away, we'll haul away Joe,
King Louis got his head cut off
Which spoiled his constitution.
Way, haul away, we'll haul away Joe.

Chorus;
Way, haul away, we'll haul for better weather,
Way, haul away, we'll haul away Joe.

Oh the cook is in the galley
Making duff so handy
Way, haul away, we'll haul away Joe,
And the captain's in his cabin
Drinkin' wine and brandy
Way, haul away, we'll haul away Joe.

Chorus;
Way, haul away, we'll haul for better weather,
Way, haul away, we'll haul away Joe.
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