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Other Important Nautical Terms and Expressions
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BINNACLE

1) Stand which was used for lamp
or lantern. 2) Stand, pedestal, box, case or housing,
located near Helm on Bridge in which Ship’s Steering
compass is fixed or which Compass box or case is
contained, mounted, housed or secured and usually
illuminated at night. Also contained log-glasses, watchglasses
and lights to show compass at night. Two
Binnacles on ship’s Deck, one designed for person who
steered, other for individual who superintended steerage,
whose office was called conning. From Latin,
‘habitaculum’, place of habitation. Not to be confused
with Barnacle.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BLACK MARIA

1) National heroine who
delivered swivel guns to outfit Cutters built to protect
American merchant ships. Feared by criminals because of
her awesome strength. She also demolished band of
smugglers, opened clean and well mannered Boston
boardinghouse for sailors, escorted troublesome prisoners
to jail and once rescued a policeman from attack. 2)
British police horse vans or paddy wagons were
nicknamed Black Marias in her honor.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BLIND EYE, A OR TURN A

During the Battle of
Copenhagen, British Admiral Nelson, as second in
command, ignored an order to withdraw by placing his
telescope to his blind eye. He then proceeded to win the
battle.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BLOOD MONEY

Amounts paid based on
the numbers of enemy crew slaughtered in battle and not
based on the size or importance of the enemy ship.
Officially termed Bounty Money, monies paid for sinking
an enemy Vessel.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BLUEJACKET

Nickname for naval
enlisted men. From custom of Royal Navy sailors wearing
first uniform ever officially sanctioned, which included a
short blue jacket open in front.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BOAT CALLED “SHE”

[Non politically correct
version]. Boat is called "she" because there is always a
great deal of bustle around her; there is usually a gang of
men about; she has a waist and stays; it takes a lot of paint
and powder to keep her looking good. It is not the initial
expense that breaks you, it's the upkeep. She can be
decked out; it takes an experienced man to handle her
correctly, and without a man at the helm she is
uncontrollable. She often shows her bottom and when
coming into harbor always heads for the buoys.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BORN WITH A SILVER SPOON IN HIS MOUTH

Sons of privilege entered Navy and were promoted
without taking examinations. Considered to have entered
through Stern cabin windows where silver plate was used
for meal service. Lower class sailors were referred to as
entering Navy through Hawsehole and sailor was ‘born
with a wooden ladle in his mouth’.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BROACH ( ING )

1) Sudden, unplanned and
uncontrolled turning of Vessel so that Hull is Broadside or
Beam on to seas, parallel to Waves or Wind, subjecting
Ship to possible capsize. Loss of steering, to spin or get
out of control, turn or slew toward wind due to
mishandling or action of elemens. Heading up sharply and
Capsize or come close to Capsize, usually when sailing off
Wind. What sailing craft does when she involuntarily
turns too much to Windward when Running Free. From
French, ‘brochier’, meaning turn. AKA broach to. 2)
Piece of jewelry that you would not want to wear in heavy
weather at sea.
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Salty Dog
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Posts: 4672



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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2017 12:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BULLY BEEF

Sailors of Colonial Navy
had daily menu of this amazingly elastic and stringy
substance, actually beef jerky. Term appeared so
frequently on the messdeck that it naturally lent its name
to sailors who had to eat it. See Bully Boy. As
indication of beef's texture and chewability, it was also
called "salt junk," alluding to rope yarn used for caulking
the ship's seams. From name for bull carcasses of French
‘boulli’, meaning boiled meat.


BULLY BOY

Term prominent in Navy chanties
and poems, means in its strictest sense, "beef eating
Sailors."
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 1:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BURNT OFFERINGS

It was believed that fat
encouraged scurvy and cook could also see excess fat (see
Slush Fund). Thus meats were cooked until they were
completely dehydrated and defatted liked this.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 2:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BY AND LARGE

1) Sail as close to wind
as possible without being hard on wind and to sail off or
with wind full in sails. Imprecise method includes all
ways of sailing from least favorable to the most. 2)
Describing passage which included bad days of headwinds
when Vessel would be sailed By the Wind, and good days
when the large or square sails could be used giving more
comfort and better speed. 3) In general, on the whole or
overall. 4) Vessel that is a good sailing vessel er on all
points from on (‘By’) the wind to ‘large’ with the sheets
well eased. See Full and By. 5) For the most part.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 2:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CAREEN ( ING )

1) Method to deliberately
beach or ground ship at high tide, then Heel or place boat
on side. Haul over ship or tip Vessel at steep angle so
that Bottom or underwater parts come out of water and are
accessible for making repairs or work such as scraping
barnacles, repainting, caulking, etc. From French
‘carene’, keel or Latin ‘carina’, keel. AKA Careening.
See Breaming and Caulking. 2) Leaning, swaying or
tipping to one side of something while in motion.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 2:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CLEAT

1) Short piece of wood nailed
across a sloping Gangway to provide sure footing. 2) ‘T’,
anvil, hook or horn shaped piece of wood, metal fitting,
rigging fitting or plastic. Used to tie off, make fast, secure
or temporarily attach Line or wire rope under strain such
as Mooring Lines, Sail Control Lines (Sheets and
Halyards) and miscellaneous Lines. Two kinds exist; horn
and quick action. AKA Cavil.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 2:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CLOSE QUARTERS

1) Defensive structure or wooden
barriers used in merchant ships and erected across Decks
when attacks were expected. Consisted of heavy baulks of
timber placed around after Deck or quarters with holes cut
(apertures) through so that muskets could fire. See
Loopholes. 2) Immediate contact or something done had
to had or at close range.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 2:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CORSAIR

1) An especially independent
Privateer. 2) Any pirate from the Barbary Coast. From
French, ‘corsaire’, raid. From ‘corsair’ Spanish word for
someone between Pirate and Privateer See Buccaneer and
Freebooter.
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