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Other Important Nautical Terms and Expressions
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 3:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SUN IS OVER THE YARDARM

It’s time for a
drink! North Atlantic ship passengers had to wait until
this occurred (around midday in those latitudes) before
they could get a drink. This coincided with forenoon
‘stand easy’, officers would also take advantage of break
to go below for their firs tot of spirits for day.
AKA Sun over the yardarm or sun is over the foreyard
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SWASHBUCKLER

1) Swaggering show-off. From
Old English ‘swash’ meant to dash against or drum and
‘buckler’ was a small hand held shield used to catch sword
blows of opponent. They dashed or beat own shield or beat
sword agaist shield to create drumming sound prior to fight
to intimidate enemy or while they walked through streets,
but weren’t always good swordsmen. Also had reputation
for taking money to defend someone and then running
when going got tough. 2) Action packed, romantic film,
novel or work of fiction featuring adventurous characters
and much swordplay, especially about pirates
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 3:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SWEET FANNY ADAMS

1) British term
for tinned meat. From a girl brutally murdered and
dismembered with her parts found in a kettle or trunk near
a British Navy Yard at the same time of the switch to
tinned meat. See Fannies, Fanny Adams, Harriet Lane.
2) Being disposessed with an empty Fanny after
completed meal
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 3:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SWINGING THE LEAD

1) Ascertaining the depth
of water with a Lead Line by making a continuous number
of casts by twirling the line around your head and letting it
fly ahead so that by the time the lead had sunk to Bottom,
ship’s headway would have brought the line perpendicular
and correct depth could be seen. Less competent
Leadsmen would twirl but be unable to read the depth
correctly, thus only pretending to work. 2) Lazy. Many
who watched the Leadsman considered it such effortless
work that they borrowed the term.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TACK

1) Either bottom corner of square Sail. 2)
Forward or leading lower or bottom corner of Fore and
Aft Sail such as Mainsail, Jib or Mizzen. Where Luff and
Foot meet or lower Windward corner of Spinnaker. AKA
Weather Clew. 3) Generic term for Coming About or
Jibing, but often and incorrectly used only to describe
Coming About. Change course by Heading Up and
passing Bow or Falling Off and passing Stern through Eye
of Wind with Sails then swinging across Boat. 4) Each
leg of zigzag course sailed to Windward or Downwind
where Vessel is making progress against wind and wind
strikes one side of Bows and then other. Any course or
Heading in relation to wind or which wind comes over
either side of Boat. 5) Rope attached to Tack of Sail and
used to work it. 6) Food of any kind. See Hardtack and
On the Right or Wrong Tack.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TAKE DOWN A PEG

1) Ship’s colors were
raised and lowered by system of pegs; the higher the peg,
the higher the honor. Moving flag down from one flag
Halyard secured with pegs to lower peg. Done when senior
Admiral handed over his command to junior whose flag
would have to be flown in subordinate position. 2) Blunt
somebody’s pride, humble someone or lower them in their
own or everyone else’s eyes. AKA Take Down a Peg or
Two.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TAKE THE GILT OFF THE GINGERBREAD


The British Admiralty’s spoilt attraction to Gingerbread
when it was discovered that it was more expensive to
decorate a ship than equip her with cannon. See
Gingerbread.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TAPS

1) Tat-too is signal given for soldiers to
extinguish lights, retire to their barracks or quarters, to put
out their fire and candle and go to bed. Public houses are
at same time, to shut their doors, and sell no more liquor
that night. 2) Custom of sounding taps at funerals.
Bugle call possibly composed by General Daniel
Butterfield, commander of a brigade in Army of the
Potomac, in July 1862. From Dutch ‘taptoe’, time to close
up all taps and taverns in garrisoned towns.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TELL IT TO THE MARINES ( THE SAILORS
WON’T BELIEVE IT )

1) Statement or
expression of cynical disbelief. ‘Come on now, I just
cannot believe it!’ Off duty sailors would amuse
themselves by telling far fetched stories. Disbelieving
sailor, not able to swallow one of these tall tales would
utter the phrase aimed insultingly at marines who were
assigned to warships to keep order and not well liked.
They were generally considered by sailors as less
intelligent, more gullible and less well informed. See
Marines.
2) Submitting a doubtful statement to wise and
experienced marine for them to pass judgement upon.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TENDING THE SIDE

iping as ceremony with
Side Boys is custom evolving from days when visitors
were hoisted aboard by use of Boatswain's Chair. Pipe
was used for commands "hoist away" and
"avast heaving." Members of crew of host ship did
hoisting. It is from the aid they rendered in Tending The
Side that custom originated of having a certain number of
men or SideBoys present. In time it became a courtesy
for high ranking officers and diplomatic officials to
honored by sideboys and piping ceremony.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

THREE ROWS OF TAPE

Used collar of British
bluejacket's jumper was authorized in 1857. Originally, it
was suggested two rows of white, but for no reason
Admiralty decided on three. Idea of commemorating
Nelson's three victories was never mentioned at the time.
Therefore, three lines on the collar of a bluejacket's blouse
are selected for decorative effect and have no special
significance
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TOE THE LINE

Space between each pair
of deck planks in wooden ship was filled with a packing
material called "oakum" and then sealed with mixture of
pitch and tar. Result was series of parallel lines half-foot
or so apart, running length of Deck. Once a week, usually
on Sunday, warship's crew was ordered to fall in at
quarters. Each group would line up in formation on given
area of Deck. To insure neat alignment of each row,
sailors were directed to stand with toes just touching
particular seam. Another use seams was punitive.
Youngsters, ship's boys or student officers might be
required to stand with toes just touching designated seam
for length of time as punishment for minor infraction of
discipline, such as talking or fidgeting at wrong time.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TOPLESS LADIES

Bare breasted women are which
are traditionally said to calm stormy seas. I figure it can’t
hurt to ask even when at Beaufort Zero. Either we are in a
storm or a storm is coming. See Figurehead.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TOUCH AND GO

1) Running two person barge
which was unable to Sound depth of water into side of a
river or channel until it ‘Touched’ the bottom, then
promptly Tacking. Usually momentum was sufficient to
ensure they kept going but would sometimes go Aground.
2) Rounding ship very narrowly to escape rocks, etc. or
when she rubs against ground with Keel. 3) Ship that
makes very short stay in Port while en route to final
destination. 4) Said of anything within an ace of ruin.
Highly uncertain, ‘iffy’ or precarious situation. Element of
risk is implicit when using the phrase. 5) Briefing landing,
then immediately taking off from an aircraft carrier.
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Salty Dog
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2017 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TOUCH IT WITH A 10 FOOT POLE

To keep at a distance. From 10 foot long bare poles that river
boatmen used to push their craft along in shallow water or
to fend off things..
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