Shop  •   Avatar  •   FAQ  •   Search  •   Memberlist  •   Usergroups  •   Profile  •   Log in to check private messages  •   Log in  •  Register 

Other Important Nautical Terms and Expressions
Post new topic   Reply to topic     Forum Index -> Tavern Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 12, 13, 14, 15  Next
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2017 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TRAMP

Cargo ship that carries any freight
and goes anywhere that is profitable. Ship that is not
restricted to a regular run or to one type of Cargo.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2017 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TRAVELER

1) Rings made of wood, metal or
other materials used to Bend Sails or Stays or Spars along
which they travel by means of hooks, catches or slides. 2)
Side to side or Athwartships running track which contains
sliding car or fitting to which Mainsheet is attached by
Blocks. By adjusting location of car, crew can change
Mainsail’s Angle of Attack to Wind or keep Boom in same
place as it is moved in and out. AKA Horse.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2017 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TROPICAL STORM

Cyclonic Storm with winds between 35 and 64 knots.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2017 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TRIM, TRIMMED

1) Set, pull in, ease or or adjust
Sails by means of Sheets and certain other Rigging Lines
such as pulling in Sheet. 2) Position or Set of Sails
relative to Wind. 3) Difference between Vessel’s Draft
Forward and Draft Aft as seen by comparing Draft
Markings. Fore And Aft deviation of Vessel from
designed waterline at given Draft. Condition of ship with
reference to longitudinal position in water. Way in which
Vessel Floats; on an even Keel or Trimmed by Head
(Bow) or Stern, Fore And Aft angle or Bow down / Bow
up attitude of ship when she’s at rest and not moving,
similar to Heel. Adjustable by shifting Ballast. 4)
Dispose Boats load, Masts and Sails so that Centers Of
Gravity and of Buoyancy are in same vertical plane and
Ship is stable and answers Helm.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2017 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TUMBLE HOME

Upward and inward curve, slope or
curvature (instead of vertical or almost vertical) of a some,
but not all, vessel’s sides, hull or topsides above waterline.
Common on early vessels because the curvature made it too
difficult for pirates to board
. Opposite of flare.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2017 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TURN A BLIND EYE

Ignore intentionally, possibly to
warnings. From Admiral Nelson who deliberately placed
his telescope to his blind eye during Battle of Copenhagen
so he could not see order to break off action with enemy.
He ignored the order and achieved stunning victory.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Sat Mar 18, 2017 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TURTLE

1) Capsized ship position where
the Mast is sticking straight down. You probably want to
avoid this situation. From obervation of Caribbean natives
who would capture huge sea turtles by turning them over,
therby rendering them helpless. 2) Bag used to Stow a
Spinnaker prior to hoisting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 5:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TYPHOON

Tropical revolving storm of high
intensity in the Pacific. Force 12 on the Beaufort Scale.
Tropical Cyclone with closed contours, a strong and very
pronounced circulation, and one minute maximum
sustained surface winds of 64 knots (74 mph) or
greater. Same as a Hurricane, except located in Pacific west
of International Dateline. See Cyclone and Hurricane.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 5:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TWENTY ONE GUN SALUTE

Mark of resepect
reserved for heads of states. Firing salute indicated that
saluter had disarmed themselves. Twenty one guns was
the number found on one side of larger ships of line and
firing all of them became highest mark of respect with
smaller number of guns fired in salutes to people of lesser
importance. Only odd numbers are used, reflecting
seagoing superstition against event numbers.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 5:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

UNDER THE WEATHER ( BOW )

1) Feel seasick or ill or to be adversely affected by the weather.
From side of ship’s Bow that was taking full brunt of head
seas in foul weather. If a sailor's station is at weather
bow, they may become tired of the pitching of boat and
constant spray blown into his face and thus will most
certainly be under the weather. 2) Case of the ‘blahs’.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 5:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

UP THE CREEK ( WITHOUT A PADDLE )In a bad predicament, on the spot or behind the eight ball.
AKA Up Salt Creek. From political campaign song ‘Blaine
Up Salt Creek’ and ease in which it is ease to get stuck.
Without paddle, boatman would have no way to pole their
way out.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 6:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

WALK THE CHALK

1) Custom of walking line of
sobriety along straight chalk line drawn along Deck of
Ship as test for drunkenness. An Sailor who couldn’t walk
whole line was adjudged drunk and punished, often by
flogging. 2) Obey or follow rules.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 6:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

WALK ( ING ) THE PLANK

1) Long planks of light
wood, coated in waterproof tar and used as ‘life
preservers’ is ship sank. 2) Forced to walk off Gangway
into ocean. No proof that this was ever utilized by
pirates. Prisoners were more commonly Marooned.

Salty's Note - the real fear of a pirate was being left on a desert island alone with no food or water - being "Marooned" was a TERRIBLE way to go and usually they left the person a bottle of rum and a loaded musket. He would drink the whole bottle of rum and then commit suicide, no joke.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

WALLOP

1) Refers to British Admiral
Wallop who specialized in raiding French coast and
destroying towns, villages and harbors. From Middle
English ‘wallope’, horses gallop, violent heavy movement
or heavy, resounding blow. 2) A large hit, sound
thrashing or good beating.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3779



95625 Gold -

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

WARDROOM

1) Originally was known
as Wardrobe Room, place where officers kept spare
wearing apparel. It was also space below Great Cabin
where any loot secured from enemy ships, was stored.
Utilized to store valuable articles taken from prizes. In an
effort to have some privacy on crowded ship, officers
would sometimes lounge and take their meals in Wardrobe
Room, particularly when outward bound when it was
empty. 2) Today, it is place on board ship where
officers take their meals, relax, and socialize. Officer’s
messroom.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic     Forum Index -> Tavern All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 12, 13, 14, 15  Next
Page 13 of 15

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group