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Other Important Nautical Terms and Expressions
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2017 6:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

WASTERS, WAISTERS

Older, less fit personnel,
greenhands, broken down seamen or landsmen Pressed into
service who could not be trusted to work aloft. They
worked or were placed at ship’s Waist to do duty not
requiring knowledge of seamanship such as mending sails,
splicing, cleaning, etc. From Old English ‘waest’,
reference to shape of fruit, especially narrow end of pear
then expanded to include middle of ship. Also from Old
French ‘wastere’ and Old English ‘guaste’, one who
ravages or dissipates. 2) Idlers, loafers, no good layabouts.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 7:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

WATCH ( ES )

1) Period of duty served
by people aboard Ship at their different posts. On duty.
Traditionally, a 24-hour day is divided into seven watches
aboard ship. These are:
midnight to 4 a.m. 0000-0400 middle or
mid-watch
4 to 8 a.m. 0400-0800 morning watch
8 a.m. to noon 0800-1200 forenoon watch
noon to 4 p.m. 1200-1600 afternoon watch
4 to 6 p.m. 1600-1800 first dog watch
6 to 8 p.m. 1800-2000 second dog watch
8 p.m. to midnight 2000-2400 evening watch
or 1st night watch
The half hours of the watch are marked by the striking the
bell an appropriate number of times. 2) Act of listening
on designated frequency. 3) Timepiece.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 7:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

WEARING A CHECKERED SHIRT

Slang term for having received Flogging after pattern of welts left on
victim's back.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2017 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

WEDDING GARLAND

1) From the tradition of
hoisting some greenery at the Mast when a ship came home
safely to the good earth. 2) A signal for women to come
aboard. 3) Signifying nuptials as a garland of flowers
were flown from the mast top whenever a crew member
was married. Garland from the Greek meaning a collection
of flowers.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

YARD

1) Long, nearly cylindrical piece of timber,
tapering toward ends or ‘Thwartshp Spar usually hung
crosswise or fixed horizontally to Mast or crossing Mast on
which any Square Sail is Fitted or supported. Made of
single Timber or number of pieces. Used for supporting
and extending sail to Wind. Enabled to Traverse freely by
means of Parrels. From Anglo Saxon, ‘seglegerld, meaning
sail yard or ‘givid’. 2) Place where boats are stored,
constructed or repaired.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

YARDARM

1) Outer portions or tip of Yard used in
sailing ships for hoisting flags or hanging condemned men.
2) A’Thwrtship spar on the mast of a naval or merchant
ship or smaller powerboats, used for signals. See Braces.
AKA Yard Arm.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

YANKEE

1) Large jib topsail carried by some
racing yachts. 2) All U.S. Americans or New England
Sailors. From Dutch, ‘jan kee’, little John or John Cheese,
terms contemptuously applied by English first to Dutch
seaman and thence to others. Or from early Dutch
referring to American sea captains who were known but
not revered for their ability to drive hard bargain.
Dutchmen, who were also regarded as extremely frugal,
jokingly referred to the hard to please Americans as
"Yankers" or wranglers.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

YAW

Sail wildly erratic Course, swing
temporarily or Steer off or from course by action of
following or quartering sea, Running with quartering sea,
bad Steering or generally difficult sea conditions. Action
takes place independently of a Vessel’s steering system but
may be counteracted by an alert Helmsperson who can
anticipate the ‘swing’. From the Icelandic, ‘jaga’, to go to
and fro.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

YOU CAN’T COD ME

Meaning ‘you can’t get a
rise out of me’ or ‘you won’t make me rise to the bait like
a codfish’. See Cod.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:25 pm    Post subject: Humorous Terms Reply with quote

Funny versions of phrases....

ABAFT What you can take only in the most luxurious cabins

ABEAM A large length of metal, supporting something like a deck or a wall

ABOARD Same as abeam, but made of wood

AFT Anyplace behind the bow

AMIDSHIPS Condition of being surrounded by boats.

ANCHOR A device designed to bring up mud samples from the bottom at inopportune or unexpected times.

ANCHOR LIGHT Small light used to discharge the battery before daylight.

ATHWARTS Cross between foot fungus and growths on hands; caused by handling or walking on very active toads

AYE AYE Expression of surprise, usually followed by "cheewawa"

BATTERY Electrochemical storage device capable of lighting a lamp of a wattage approximately equal to that of a refrigerator lamp for a period of 15 minutes after having been charged for two hours.

BEAM SEA Situation in which waves strike a boat from
the side, causing it to roll unpleasantly. This is one of the
four directions from which wave action tends to produce
extreme physical discomfort. The other three are `bow sea'
(waves striking from the front), `following sea' (waves
striking from the rear), and `quarter sea' (waves striking
from any other direction).

BEARING What goes on around the pool
BEATING TO WINDWARD Method of flogging crew to increase upwind performance when racing.

BIFURCATION BUOY Buoy that you can’t tell if its coming or going.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2017 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BERTH A little addition to the crew. Also a
parking spot for the ship but you have to look very carefully
to see the lines painted on the water.

BOOM Sometimes the result of a surprise jibe.

BOTTOM PAINT What you get when the cockpit
seats are freshly painted.

BOW Bend over in honor; also pointy end of
ship, usually passes through the water before the rest of the
ship

BRIDGE Where the Captain rants and rails when he
gets stern

BULKHEAD Very large restroom

CABIN Closet-like space costing $300 per day,
used for sleeping and not much else

CHART A type of map which tells you exactly
where you are aground.

CLEW Indication from the skipper as to
what he might do next.

COMPANIONWAY A double berth.

COURSE What the Navigator is studying in his spare
time at night school, hoping to figure out what an astrolabe
or a sextant is

DAVIT Killed Goliath, never went to sea

DEAD RECKONING Course leading directly to a reef.

DEADRISE Getting up to check the anchor at 0300.

DINGHY Sound of the ship’s bell.

DECK 52 cards, used in casinos
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DEVIATION Any departure from the Captain’s orders.

DISEMBARK Get off the Ark; a good example of just how old most nautical lingo is

DISPLACEMENT When you dock your boat and can’t find it later.

DOCK Member of ship's crew caring for passenger's health

DRAFT Type of beer served in ship's bar

EMBARK Get on the Ark

ESTIMATED POSITION Place you have marked on the chart where you are sure you are not.

FATHOM Measure of water depth, somewhere between 6 inches and 20 feet

FIRST MATE Crew member necessary for skippers to practice shouting instructions to.

FOR'ARD Not a Mercury or Lincoln

FOUL WIND Breeze produced by flying turkey.

FREEBOARD 1) See abeam and aboard; this one costs
nothing. 2) Food and liquor supplied by the owner.

FUNNEL The only place on the ship where you should see smoke, other than the bar; see stack

GALLEY Where the slaves sit and row, or, in the case of modern ships, turn the screws

GANGWAY Ramp where groups (gangs) of salespeople
await the ship's passengers

HAWSER Passenger from Indiana

HEAD Something like a scuttlebutt or scupper, but with running water

HEADWAY What you are making if you can’t get the
toilet to work.

HEAVE-HO What you do when you’ve eaten too much Ho.

HELM Southern senator; also steering wheel
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 12:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HULL Outside portion of a nut

JACOBS LADDER Song popular at camp

JIBE Either you like it or you don’t and it gets you.

KEEL 1) Barnacle collector; don't worry,
you can't see it, so don't expect to be invited to admire the
ship's collection. 2) Term used by 1st mate after too much
heel by skipper.

KNOT Not a mile-per-hour, but a little more

LANDLUBBER Anyone on board who wishes he were not.

LATITUDE 1) What the Captain will NOT give his
crew, when he is stern , or ranting and railing . The
number of degrees off course allowed a guest.

LEEWARD In the direction of Atwater, Petty, or Greenwood

LINE What can get you in good with that blonde in the bar

LOG Tree, lying down; could become aboard

LONGITUDE Like latitude, but longer

MAST Religious ritual used before setting sail.

MASTER Another term for the Captain; pronounce it
properly, or they may get stern

MIZZEN An object you can’t find.

NAUTICAL MILE Not a real mile; too far to swim to shore

PITCH What the ship's bow does in rough
weather; what the passengers do, on the other hand,
includes the word "throw"

PORT Favorite nautical wine; also means "left"
(both words have four letters, a mnemonic device useful to
many); also city with ship berths , designed to create a giant
sucking sound in the vicinity of your wallet

PORTHOLE Entry to a harbor; OK, it really means a
small window that costs an extra $100 per day, but how
funny is that?
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 12:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

QUAY Another word for dock ; arguing about the
proper pronunciation can pass hours (kway? kay? key?
kwie? who knows?)

RAILING What the Captain does when he gets stern ;
same as ranting

RAM An intricate docking maneuver sometimes
used by experienced skippers.

RHUMB LINE Two or more crew members waiting for a
drink.

ROLL Small bread served in dining room; also
another motion of the ship in rough weather, but greatly
reduced by stabilizers

SCREWS Propellers; apparently turned by slaves in
galley

SCUPPER Drain at the edge of a deck, to allow water
to run off; if water is running in, see "sink"

SKIPPER Slang term for a flying fish, or a flat stone

SHEET Cool, damp, salty night covering.

SHROUD Equipment used in connection with a wake.

SINK Unless there is a huge amount of frantic
activity on deck, large stainless steel unit in the kitchen

SQUARE RIGGER A rigger over 30.

STABILIZER Device to counteract ship's roll; several
umbrella drinks will have the opposite effect, in case you
want to experiment with what cruises were like before the
invention of stabilizers

STACK Refers to pancakes, funnels, or possibly
girls around the pool

STARBOARD 1) Like aboard , but pointing at the night
sky; also means "right", which has absolutely no mnemonic
relationship, so no one remembers it without thinking about
"port" first. 2) Special board used by skippers for
navigation (usually with "Port" on the opposite side.)

STATEROOM Cabin where you can lie in state

STERN The Captain, when the crew acts like the
crew of the Love Boat; also the roundy (or, on modern
cruise ships, squarish) end of the ship. Usually passes
through the water after the rest of ship.
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Salty Dog
Boatswain
Posts: 3886



858 Gold -

PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2017 12:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SWELL A wave that’s just great.

TENDER How your skin will feel after the first day
on a Caribbean cruise; also small boat to take passengers
ashore, making them wonder why their port taxes are not
being used to construct a dock with cruise ship berths

WAKE What you won't want to do at 6 a.m., if you
attended the midnight buffet

WEIGH ANCHOR Complicated operation involving
very large scales, necessary before every ship's departure

WINDLASS Completely still; no wind

YARDARM Important ship feature, determining if it's
time for a rum
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